One of the most complex and elaborate characters in The Scarlet Letter is Pearl, the daughter of Hester Prynne and Arthur Dimmesdale. Pearl, throughout the story, develops into a dynamic individual, as well as an extremely important symbol- one who is constantly changing. Pearl is involved in a complex history, and as a result is viewed as different and is shunned because of her mother’s sin. Pearl is a living Scarlet A to Hester, as well as the reader, acting as a constant reminder of Hester’s sin.Hawthorne uses vivid descriptions to characterize Pearl. Physically, Pearl has a “beauty that became every day more brilliant, and the intelligence that threw its quivering sunshine over the tiny features of this child.

” “Pearl was a born outcast of the infantile world… the whole peculiarity, in short, of her position in respect to other children.” (86). Pearl was not accepted by the children; her unavoidable seclusion was due to the sin of her mother.

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On the rare occasion that the children would show interest in Pearl she would “grow positively terrible in her puny wrath, snatching up stones to fling at them…” (87)As a result of Pearl’s seclusion from society nature sympathizes with Pearl, which can be seen with the role of the sunshine in the forest. The sunshine is grateful for Pearl, accepting her as an equal. (188). Because Pearl isn’t accepted by the community she takes on the characteristics of nature because nature accept her as one of its own. Pearl’s character “lacked reference, and adaptation to the world into which she was born. Pearl and nature are referred to as not adapting to Puritan society.

Hawthorne’s descriptions and developments of the relationship between Pearl and Nature further characterizes Pearl who has been thrust out of Puritan society. The members of the Puritan society view Pearl as a weird, strange little girl, born from a sinful act. However, the characters with a closer, more in depth relationship to the child, feel differently towards Pearl.

“She is a strange child! Hester describes her unbalanced feelings and emotions to Dimmesdale. This statement shows that although Pearl’s quirks and oddities cause her to become “strange” in the eyes of others, they form into a love from Hester. This relationship between Hester and Pearl is important because both are ostracized for their irregularities and for the sin and shame of Hester. I have even been afraid of little Pearl!” Because Pearl continuously demands public recognition (seen in Chapter 19, as well as Chapter 21) Dimmesdale grows a fear towards her. Hester, again, describes her relationship with Pearl while attempting to convince the Governor to allow her to maintain Pearl’s mother. Pearl punishes me too!” (104).

This quote examines the importance of Pearl in Hester’s life. She allows Hester to feel happiness, as well as serves as a constant reminder and punishment of the sin that Hester has committed. Pearl is involved in an extremely perplexing and elaborate history and background. Pearl’s mother, Hester, was punished for adultery, therefore Pearl was the result of her sin.

Pearl, being Hester’s child as a result is involved in Hester’s history as well. Pearl is brought up with only a mother, whom is ostracized from society as well. Pearl plays one of the most crucial roles in The Scarlet Letter. Hawthorne uses Pearl as an effective and dynamic character; she is a constant reminder to Hester of her sin. When we were first introduced to Pearl, she was immediately drawn to the scarlet A on Hester’s bosom. “But the first object of which Pearl seemed to become aware was the scarlet letter on Hester’s bosom! (88). Beginning at infancy, Pearl served as a reminder of the Scarlet A on her bosom.

In Chapter 7 Pearl and Hester go to the Governor’s house and Pearl’s attire “inevitably reminded the beholder of the token which Hester Prynne was doomed to wear upon her bosom. It was the scarlet letter in another form; the scarlet letter endowed with life!” (93). Pearl is dressed in a scarlet dress with gold fringe exactly resembling the scarlet A on Hester’s bosom. Pearl had a natural inclination to focus on the scarlet letter, which is show in its fullest in Chapter 15. (163). Throughout Pearl’s continuos questions Hester has never denied the significance of the scarlet A on her bosom. However, in this scene Hester eventually has to deny its significance to Pearl after she ceaselessly confronts her mother of its significance.

One of the most symbolic scenes in the novel occurs in the forest as Pearl Hester are traveling to meet Dimmesdale. Pearl remarks to Hester that “the sunshine does not love you. In one of the most dramatic scenes in the novel Pearl prevents Hester from escaping her sin and shame. In the one moment that Hester attempts to escape her sin, Pearl refuses to recognize and acknowledge her until she returns to the shameful mother that she has always known. Pearl is a guiltless child, with all a child’s freshness and spontaneity, however to Hester is a persistent remembrance to the scarlet A, which she must bare on her bosom.There are many continuous themes in which Pearl and her actions are large contributions to their overall portrayal.

The theme of alienation, which is exhibited throughout all of the main characters, is clearly seen in the descriptions of Pearl. Pearl is always unaccepted by the community (which has already been addressed); she is shunned because of her mother’s sin. While Pearl approaches her mother, whom is not wearing the scarlet A and whose hair is down, she refuses to acknowledge her without her A and capped hair. This shows Pearl’s dissent for beauty as a solution to sin, which is expressed in the first few chapter when Hester is lightly punished for her adultery.

Because of Pearl’s banishment from Puritan society she was thrown to another way of life and her wildness and peculiarity is a direct product of her banishment. Pearl is an important character, as she is a constant reminder to Hester, as well as to the reader, of the constant sin of Hester. One of the most complex and elaborate characters in The Scarlet Letter is Pearl, the daughter of Hester Prynne and Arthur Dimmesdale. Pearl is involved in a complex history, and as a result is viewed as different and is shunned because of her mother’s sin. Pearl is a living Scarlet A to Hester, as well as the reader, acting as a constant reminder of Hester’s sin.

Hawthorne uses vivid descriptions to characterize Pearl. Physically, Pearl has a “beauty that became every day more brilliant, and the intelligence that threw its quivering sunshine over the tiny features of this child.” (86). Pearl was not accepted by the children; her unavoidable seclusion was due to the sin of her mother.

On the rare occasion that the children would show interest in Pearl she would “grow positively terrible in her puny wrath, snatching up stones to fling at them…” (87)As a result of Pearl’s seclusion from society nature sympathizes with Pearl, which can be seen with the role of the sunshine in the forest. The sunshine is grateful for Pearl, accepting her as an equal. (188). Because Pearl isn’t accepted by the community she takes on the characteristics of nature because nature accept her as one of its own. Pearl’s character “lacked reference, and adaptation to the world into which she was born. Pearl and nature are referred to as not adapting to Puritan society. Hawthorne’s descriptions and developments of the relationship between Pearl and Nature further characterizes Pearl who has been thrust out of Puritan society.

The members of the Puritan society view Pearl as a weird, strange little girl, born from a sinful act. However, the characters with a closer, more in depth relationship to the child, feel differently towards Pearl. “She is a strange child! Hester describes her unbalanced feelings and emotions to Dimmesdale. This statement shows that although Pearl’s quirks and oddities cause her to become “strange” in the eyes of others, they form into a love from Hester.

This relationship between Hester and Pearl is important because both are ostracized for their irregularities and for the sin and shame of Hester. I have even been afraid of little Pearl!” Because Pearl continuously demands public recognition (seen in Chapter 19, as well as Chapter 21) Dimmesdale grows a fear towards her. Hester, again, describes her relationship with Pearl while attempting to convince the Governor to allow her to maintain Pearl’s mother. Pearl punishes me too!” (104). This quote examines the importance of Pearl in Hester’s life.

Pearl is involved in an extremely perplexing and elaborate history and background. Pearl’s mother, Hester, was punished for adultery, therefore Pearl was the result of her sin. Pearl, being Hester’s child as a result is involved in Hester’s history as well. Pearl is brought up with only a mother, whom is ostracized from society as well.

Pearl plays one of the most crucial roles in The Scarlet Letter. Hawthorne uses Pearl as an effective and dynamic character; she is a constant reminder to Hester of her sin. When we were first introduced to Pearl, she was immediately drawn to the scarlet A on Hester’s bosom. “But the first object of which Pearl seemed to become aware was the scarlet letter on Hester’s bosom! (88). Beginning at infancy, Pearl served as a reminder of the Scarlet A on her bosom. In Chapter 7 Pearl and Hester go to the Governor’s house and Pearl’s attire “inevitably reminded the beholder of the token which Hester Prynne was doomed to wear upon her bosom. It was the scarlet letter in another form; the scarlet letter endowed with life!” (93).

Pearl is dressed in a scarlet dress with gold fringe exactly resembling the scarlet A on Hester’s bosom. Pearl had a natural inclination to focus on the scarlet letter, which is show in its fullest in Chapter 15. (163). Throughout Pearl’s continuos questions Hester has never denied the significance of the scarlet A on her bosom. However, in this scene Hester eventually has to deny its significance to Pearl after she ceaselessly confronts her mother of its significance.

One of the most symbolic scenes in the novel occurs in the forest as Pearl Hester are traveling to meet Dimmesdale. Pearl remarks to Hester that “the sunshine does not love you. In one of the most dramatic scenes in the novel Pearl prevents Hester from escaping her sin and shame. In the one moment that Hester attempts to escape her sin, Pearl refuses to recognize and acknowledge her until she returns to the shameful mother that she has always known. Pearl is a guiltless child, with all a child’s freshness and spontaneity, however to Hester is a persistent remembrance to the scarlet A, which she must bare on her bosom.

Pearl is always unaccepted by the community (which has already been addressed); she is shunned because of her mother’s sin. While Pearl approaches her mother, whom is not wearing the scarlet A and whose hair is down, she refuses to acknowledge her without her A and capped hair. This shows Pearl’s dissent for beauty as a solution to sin, which is expressed in the first few chapter when Hester is lightly punished for her adultery. Pearl is an important character, as she is a constant reminder to Hester, as well as to the reader, of the constant sin of Hester. Bibliography:

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